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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Patrick Leahy
U.S. Senator (D- Vermont), Judiciary Committee Chairman
CSPAN 12/11/2013
Leahy: the only limitation (under the FISA pen register statute) would be that it would be meta data? Cole: It cannot be content. In the latest order of the FISA court under 215, it specifically excluded cell site location as well. Litt: I was going to add only that you'd have to show that the categories of meta data that you're seeking was, in fact, relevant to the authorized investigation.
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
FOXNEWSW 12/11/2013
Herridge: Before the Senate Judiciary Committee the NSA Director, Keith Alexander gave a spirited defense of his agency and the bulk collection of American’s phone records saying it’s like holding a hornet's nest. Alexander: We're getting stung. You've asked us to do this for the good of the nation, to defend the nation, to get the intelligence we need. Nobody has come up with a better way. If we let this down, I think we’ll have let the nation down.
Patrick Leahy
U.S. Senator (D- Vermont), Judiciary Committee Chairman
FOXNEWSW 12/11/2013
Leahy: We give up too much privacy in this country and frankly I worry about giving up too much. Herridge: Citing new leaks, including a Washington Post report alleging the NSA is tracking web traffic using cookies, your computers version of an id card. The Committee’s Democratic Chairman said his legislation to scale back data collection is needed now, not later. Leahy: I'm worried as technology gets greater and greater, the temptation whether it is this administration, the next administration or the administration after that, to people who misuse it.
Mike Rogers
Representative (R-Mich.), Chair, House Select Committee on Intelligence
KQED 12/12/2013
Warner: The PEN writers group did a survey of 250 professional writers, it just came out this week, and a quarter of these writers said they feel inhibited. They’re censoring themselves in what they discuss in e-mail in the research they do especially if it involves anything overseas. Does that, as someone who’s always believed in individual liberties, does that concern you? Rogers: The attitude certainly does. And you know, that's mortifying to me that they would feel that that would be an issue that the government would be interested in, candidly. Even their engaged into some issue that may be even questionable, if it's a political issue and you are expressing yourself, you need to feel comfortable that you can do that in the United States. We should never lose that.
Mike Rogers
Representative (R-Mich.), Chair, House Select Committee on Intelligence
KQED 12/12/2013
Warner: some members of Congress at least on the senate side feel that they've been mislead about by the head of the NSA, by the Director of National Intelligence about how much data is being collected on America, metadata, whatever you want to call it. Do you feel that there's been any either misleading, willful or otherwise about the extent of that? Rogers: I know as the chairman of the house intelligence committee, we have had this information. We have been briefed on it. We've had an opportunity to ask questions on it. I supported these programs. We had some differences. We worked them out. Were there problems that we found? Yes. But we work with them in the appropriate channels, classified channels to fix them. Like you would expect us to do as member of the oversight committee. But at the end of the day I supported them when nobody knew about them. And I support them now.
Ron Wyden
U.S. Senator (D-Oregon), Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
KQED 12/13/2013
Warner: Do you even know how many Americans are being swept up, have been swept up in this NSA surveillance that is actually targeted on overseas terror threats? Wyden: Suffice it to say, we have asked this question, in classified sessions, in public sessions. And largely have been stonewalled. Now of course from the information that has been declassified, you know, recently, indicates that thousands of Americans have had information, you know, collected on them. And that really leads to the central privacy question. The advocates of the bulk collection of all these on law abiding Americans say this is not surveillance. They're saying it is data collection. And they're saying we're not listening in. And for that reason it's not surveillance.
Ron Wyden
U.S. Senator (D-Oregon), Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
KQED 12/13/2013
Wyden: I want it understood for your viewers that when the government knows who you called, when you called and for how long you called, you're getting alot of private information about individuals. For example, if the government knows that you called a psychiatrist three times in 24 hours once after midnight, they know a lot about you.
Ron Wyden
U.S. Senator (D-Oregon), Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
KQED 12/13/2013
Wyden: The argument that we're not going to abuse them because we have a bunch of our own little internal, you know, rules, that's not in sync with the constitution. The fourth amendment doesn't say you can invade people's privacy but it's really kind of okay if the government then sets up some sort of general rules to make it okay. The fourth amendment in effect says you've got to have reasonable grounds to believe somebody is involved with terrorist activity, nefarious activity, in order to get this information. All along people like me were told look, you're raising all these concerns but the reality is the FISA court is going to make sure that everything is okay. What we've learned in the last few weeks is the FISA court repeatedly said things were not okay. In effect saying that they were lied to repeatedly to the point where they couldn't see how there was much of a system of rules at all.
Ron Wyden
U.S. Senator (D-Oregon), Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
KQED 12/13/2013
Warner: In this post 9/11 world, however is there any reluctance on the part of lawmakers to second-guess the intelligence professionals? Given that the cost of being wrong is so high. Wyden: The government has emergency authorities that basically say when there's a threat they can go get the information, get the warrant later. Of course protecting the safety of the public has to always come first. And I don’t take a backseat to anybody in terms of that.
Mark Zuckerberg
CEO, Facebook
CNNW 12/13/2013
Zuckerberg: I think the government has really blown it on this. You know, people want the government to help protect us but we also want the government to be transparent and tell us what they're doing and tell us what data they're collecting. And I think that they've just completely failed on that front. From what I've seen if they were just a little bit more open about what they were doing, I think they could have created a lot more trust in a better environment for everyone. But I think that they failed at that and are continuing to, which is why we're continuing to push on it as an industry.
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